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Training, internship & Employment Training, Internship and Employment When Ifa Lethu started its very first training workshop in Mamelodi township, near Pretoria, in 2007, the Foundation had been focused almost 100% on fulfilling our initial mandate of the repatriation of the country’s lost ‘struggle art’. We had launched Ifa Lethu in 2005 by bringing together as many of those original township artists still alive. The reaction to this launch and the showing, for the first time, of our fledgling collection became a game-changer for our future vision. It became clear, that while there was an important repatriation effort to do – a task still in full operation today – there was also a unique opportunity to find, educate and inspire our young creative talent, train them creatively, add business skills to enable new generations of entrepreneurs, and create employment opportunities for them in the arts sector. From this initial project in Mamelodi in 2007, with 10 young creative people, we have extended the programme to other township and rural nodes. Our recipe is to send in our Creative Hands mobile workshop, assess 18 Ifa lethu annual report 2012/13 the creativity, output and buyin of the community, refine the skills to market readiness and global quality, and ultimately open an incubator where the participants can work in a permanent, managed and secure environment. We have recently opened incubators, which are housed in refurbished containers, in Mamelodi, Soweto and Ngove in Limpopo, where our learners use the facilities to produce market-ready cultural products. Market-ready products are already available for distribution with fair prices being ploughed back into the communities (See Page 29 Crafts). In addition, our Fashion Design graduates, having passed through a rigorous series of our workshops in Durban are going on to find lucrative careers in the fashion industry. There is no doubt that the cultural sector is a key economic driver in the country’s tourism industry. The Department of Trade and Industry estimates that South Africa’s creative sector alone contributes about R2-billion or 0.14% to South Africa’s GDP annually. In addition, the sector provides jobs and income for approximately 38 000 people through an estimated 7 000 small enterprises. But we believe we can do far better than this. The creative sector can also be used as a catalyst for rural economic development and for fostering expanded participation in the economy, especially by women and youth. Furthermore, as the art of designing and producing cultural products is handed down from generation to generation, members of communities have


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