Page 4

idea_NEW_02.indd

Report from the Chair It has been a great honour for me to sit on the Board of Ifa Lethu over the past five years, so it is with great humility that I accepted the role of Chair. Over these years I have seen young faces bright with hope fulfill their creative dreams, and elderly rural men and women be taught not only to upgrade their crafting skills to global standards, but pass on this heritage to the next generations. Ifa Lethu has taken me spiritually and physically to our townships and rural areas; to meet international movers and shakers and celebrity art lovers; and to gaze proudly at our amazing Collection of struggle works repatriated from across the globe. I recently met one of our founding donors - Bruce Haigh. During the struggle Bruce was stationed in South Africa at the Australian High Commission as a young diplomat. He discovered the richness of then banned ‘township art’ and risked much to support those artists who so ably depicted the realities and ugliness of apartheid by buying their artworks. Followed by colleague Diane Johnston, these two, now retired Australian diplomats, generously kept their promises and returned their treasured collections to their home in our country and under Ifa Lethu’s care. It was a thrill for me to open my home to Bruce and his family on their last night of their holiday in our country so he could renew old friendships and meet some new successors in an evening that was a true Homecoming. Our donors constantly amaze me at how generously they donate their own collections that are part of our heritage. From all corners of the planet, art works are still coming back home, at no cost to Ifa Lethu, and which are used in our Global Advocacy programme, as well as to remind and inspire new generations of our youth. Sadly our struggle artists are slowly leaving us but happily knowing their voices will be ‘heard’ for years to come. I would be remiss if I did not mention our funders, partners, and friends who make ifa Lethu’s work so successful on all fronts. Development in the creative sector is essential to our future position on the world stage. Creativity, in the form of the arts, is a country’s soul. Over 2 000 learners have been trained in business skills, creative skills, crafting and marketing. For this, funding is required. You will find a list of these generous organisations and individuals in this report. It is my honour to also acknowledge the work of our Board members and Global Advisory Council – you are our yardsticks which measure our progress. To Dr Ramdhani, her staff and her team of consultants – I will paraphrase Winston Churchill – ‘Never was so much owed by so many to so few’. Dr Anna Mokgokong Chair “Our donors constantly amaze me at how generously they donate their own collections that are part of our heritage.” “Creativity, in the form of the arts, is a country’s soul.”


idea_NEW_02.indd
To see the actual publication please follow the link above